Raymond Arnold Highly Commended & Rodney Pople a Finalist in the 2024 Glover Prize

Image above: Raymond Arnold

Congratulations to Raymond Arnold, who has been Highly Commended in the 2024 Glover Prize, and to Rodney Pople who is also in the exhibition of finalists.

The John Glover Acquisitive Prize – (Glover Prize) has become one of Australia’s most significant awards for landscape painting and is open to artists from anywhere in the world.

The Glover Prize selected 42 finalists for 2024; which represent the Judges’ selection of the best artworks of the Tasmanian landscape.
These 42 artworks are now on display at the highly anticipated Glover Prize Exhibition in Tasmania

Glover Prize Exhibition of Finalists
8 – 17 March 2024
Falls Park Pavilion, Evandale, Tasmania

To read more about the Glover Prize please click here

To view a selection of Rodney Pople’s works visit our online Stock Rooms here

To view a selection of Raymond Arnold’s works visit our online Stock Rooms here

Raymond Arnold – Finalist in Hadley’s Art Prize

Raymond Arnold  Pigment equals Mass – Abandoned Targa viewing platform, Queenstown Hills. The Datsun driver had thirty five minutes to live  2023  oil on canvas, diptych  104 x 154 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

Congratulations to Raymond Arnold, who has been announced as a finalist in this year’s Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart for his work Pigment equals Mass.

Presented by Hadley’s Orient Hotel, the Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart is an acquisitive Australian landscape prize, which offers $100,000 to the winning entry.

Arnold’s work Pigment equals Mass was painted after a study made on-site in the hills of Queenstown, Tasmania. It follows on from a series formed in response to the hills around Arnold’s home, particularly the road which climbs out of the valley to the east.

Arnold states: “I started painting views of the Lyell Highway where it climbs east out of Queenstown, Tasmania, during lockdown. At the height of Covid I could walk that bitumen with vacancy and lose the pervasive sentiments in my mind. Indeed, the multitude of painted canvases that came from that period form a type of imaginary ossuary. Amplified into real world ‘stations of the cross’ on my/our march to the other side. Good friends already up over the gap and behind the dark horizon on that journey.”

On-site study for Pigment equals Mass – Abandoned Targa viewing platform, Queenstown Hills. The Datsun driver had thirty five minutes to live.

 

Hadley’s Orient Hotel has a long history with art, starting with art-loving landlords in the late 1800s. The Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart contributes to the art community, celebrates excellence in contemporary landscape art, promotes cultural tourism in Tasmania, and restores art to the historic walls of Hadley’s Orient Hotel. Judged by a panel of art specialists, the prize is open to Australian artists over the age of eighteen working in two-dimensional media, at all career stages. This year, the Prize invites as its judges artists Wendy Sharpe, Milan Milojevic, and Fiona Foley. The artworks will be for sale during the exhibition.

 

Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart
Hadley’s Orient Hotel
34 Murray Street, Hobart, TAS
22 July – 20 August 2023

Opening and winner announcement: Friday 21 July 2023

 

On site, Queenstown Hills.

Initial blocking in.

Work in progress on site.

Raymond Arnold – Finalist in the 2023 Glover Prize

Image above: Road to Other – Western Mountains  oil on canvas diptych  116 x 157 cm.

Congratulations to Raymond Arnold who was selected as a finalist in the The John Glover Acquisitive Prize (Glover Prize) for 2023 with his work Road to Other – Western Mountains

Celebrating the legacy of John Glover, the Glover Prize has become one of Australia’s most significant awards for landscape painting, open to artists from anywhere in the world. It is awarded annually by The John Glover Society Inc. for the work judged the best contemporary landscape painting of Tasmania.

Landscape painting is defined in its broadest sense. The aim is to stimulate conversations about the meaning and possibilities expressed in the words landscape, painting and Tasmania.

The winner receives $75,000 plus a bronze maquette of colonial artist John Glover, designed by Peter Corlett and valued at $5000. The Glover Prize is acquisitive, selected from around 40 works chosen by a panel of eminent judges.

Of his work, Arnold says: “My ‘Road to Other – Western Mountains’ painting has been developed over five months and has ‘shape-shifted’ from a small plain air painted fragment of a rocky landscape to a larger swathe of colour and brush marks across a diptych format – from a depiction of random/erratic forms to a symbolic flow of environmental churn! Weather, fire, road infrastructure and mining impacts shaping country and leaving its bones i.e. the rock and the tree stumps exposed as symbolic elements within a graphic ossuary. Writers use brackets to add information to a sentence without changing it’s meaning and in the context of this ‘Artist’s Statement’ I see my painting exisiting within brackets in the larger story of Tasmanian (West Coast) art i.e. suspended somewhere between an explorer’s straining view of a dynamic indigenous landscape and an artist’s late work depicting a sovereign, albeit environmentally corrupted, ‘First Nations’ world.” VIEW ONLINE EXHIBITION OF FINALISTS HERE