Nick Howson

b. 1963

Painter and printmaker Nick Howson was born in the United Kingdom and arrived in Australia in 1969. He completed a Diploma of Fine Arts at Prahran College in 1986. Howson was a magazine illustrator for the Sunday Age between 1997 and 2001. Howson is a highly skilled painter, best known for his characteristic mosaic compositions. His unique technique of building softened layers of oil paint to form a patchwork of colours is vibrant and engaging, combining a naivety of style with sensitive attention to detail. Quintessentially Australian in feel, the artist renders cricket pitches, rooftops, freeways and houses in almost abstract, allegorical arrangements, evocative of ancient mosaics and magnificent medieval stained glass.

Nick Howson has completed commissions for the Australian Open Tennis Poster, Melbourne; a mural for the National Gallery of Australia restaurant, Canberra; a mural for the Prahran Market, Melbourne and a significant mural at the Richmond Railway Station, Melbourne. His work is represented in collections around Australia including Artbank, Sydney; the City of Whitehorse Art Collection, VIC; Crown Casino, Melbourne; the Gold Coast City Gallery, QLD; the Horsham Regional Art Gallery, VIC; Parliament House, Canberra and the Tullamarine Airport, Melbourne.

PAST EXHIBITIONS

2019

2018

2016

2015

In Blog

Rodney Pople and Nick Howson – Finalists in the 2020 Gallipoli Art Prize

Rodney Pople, Hopes and Dreams (2019-20), oil on wood, diptych, 45 x 65cm Congratulations to artists Rodney Pople and Nick Howson who …

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Mary Tonkin – Artist Feature

Image above: Ramble, Kalorama  (detail)  2017-19  oil on linen  180 x 1890 cm Mary Tonkin has a unique ability of capturing …

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Rodney Forbes – Artist Feature

Rodney Forbes’ paintings address deeply poignant subject matter through dreamlike and surreal imagery. Figures and objects float against his trademark …

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Sue Anderson: “Savouring moments of artistic escape”

“Two weeks into lockdown, wading through the bleakness of pandemic panic, impending winter, and the wild west of Collingwood’s tumbleweed …

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